“Morgan le Fay: Children of This World” by Jo-Anne Blanco

Less is More

Almost twice as long as the first book, this part of the tale all takes place in the real world. As a result, the main strength of the first book – the magical descriptions of the faerie world – are missing, to be replaced by more of its main weakness – the lengthy inner philosophizing inappropriate to the age of the main character and not interesting enough to keep the reader involved. There are also lengthy descriptions of burials and other rites, each including the complete ritual, word for word. The ending includes a recap of the whole basic conflict from beginning to end.

A Point about Conflict.

It takes exactly the length of one novel to create, work through, and solve any specific conflict, especially the archetypical kind a child has in growing up. Then we go on to the next book in the series, and in order to create another strong, basic conflict, it is usually necessary to move along to a new stage in the child’s development. In this series, we have already been through two long books, and at the end, she’s still five years old. You can see the problem.

This is still an interesting and creative take on one of the great myths of Western Europe, and if you are a big fan of the Arthurian Legends and epic fantasy, it’s worth a look. I hope the next book in the series is more focused.

(3 / 5)

About the Author: Gordon Long

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.